Healthy Living

A tray containing a thanksgiving turkey and some vergetables

Avoid Food Poisoning this Thanksgiving!

The day after Thanksgiving is the second-busiest day of the year for urgent care clinics (the day after Christmas is the busiest). 47% more people than average come in with gastrointestinal issues, many of which could have been prevented with proper food handling and cooking. The turkey is often the culprit. Follow these tips to safely prepare your turkey this Thanksgiving.

Kids go trick or treating

Have a Safe and Happy Halloween!

It’s almost Halloween! For kids (and some adults!), October 31st is easily one of the most exciting nights of the year. Keep everyone safe by following these tips! Only adults should carve pumpkins. If your children are younger, try decorating pumpkins with markers, glitter glue, stickers, or paint as a safer alternative to carving.

a child sleeps with a teddy bear

Keep Your Child Healthy This School Year!

The new school year is in full swing! Help your kids stay healthy all year long with these practical tips. 1. Ensure that your child receives the flu shot. Getting the vaccine is the single best way to avoid the flu. Everyone over six months old should be vaccinated. 2. Teach your child how to wash his or her hands properly.

A doctor gives a boy a shot

It’s Time to Get a Flu Shot!

Have you gotten your flu shot yet? The CDC recommends that everyone get vaccinated before the end of October. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body that protect against flu, so getting vaccinated before flu season begins is the best policy. Who should get a flu shot? Everyone over six months old should be vaccinated.

A woman tries to decide whether to go to an urgent care or emergency room

Free-Standing Emergency Rooms: Know the Difference

In 2009, a Texas law permitted the establishment of emergency rooms independent of hospitals. As a result, free-standing ERs resemble urgent care centers in many ways and are popping up in neighborhoods across Texas. Knowing how to identify these FCERs (as they are sometimes called), can save you thousands of dollars. Here’s what you need to know:

A floatation devices floats in a pool

Dry Drowning: Separating Fact from Fiction

A story relating to “dry drowning” has permeated social media in the recent weeks, for good reason. The story seems to be out of a parent’s worst nightmare. A child who swam a few days earlier dies suddenly with water in his lungs and some physicians refer to the incident as “dry drowning”.  Many of the stories and articles continually shared about the incident contain misinformation. Continue reading to separate  fact from fiction.